• Athanasakeion Archaeological Museum
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  • Athanasakeion Archaeological Museum
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  • Athanasakeion Archaeological Museum
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  • Athanasakeion Archaeological Museum
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Athanasakeion Archaeological Museum
Volos
Athanasakeion Archaeological Museum


Time schedule
Time schedule

  • Winter – 8:00-15:00
  • Summer- 8:00-17:00

Prices
Prices

  • 3€ euro per person
  • Reduced ticket: 2€

Volos Culture

Athanasakeion Archaeological Museum

Travel back to 6000BC and discover the fascinating past of Thessaly. The Archaeological Museum of Volos is the perfect way to spend an educational day during your holidays.

It was built in 1909 and owes its name to the donor who funded its construction. The Athanassakio Archaeological Museum houses exhibits in a spacious neoclassical building with garden. You will have the opportunity to see a variety of findings from different but equally important periods of Greek history.

Most objects in the collection were discovered in the early 20th century or during modern excavations in the region of Thessaly. Some of the earliest findings are related to the Neolithic settlements of Dimini and Sesklo. Others belong to the Geometric Period – the period of the Argonauts and the Trojan War- the Hellenistic Period and its classical heritage or the modern Byzantine era with its exquisite religious art.

The findings range from household utensils and agricultural tools to weapons, jewelry, coins and gold artifacts. All items are labeled and described in both English and Greek, thus allowing you to visualize the way people of the region lived thousands of years ago. The collection is organised chronologically, which offers an interesting insight into the evolution of technology, weaponry and culture over the centuries. Outside the museum, there are also some interesting restoration houses found at Dimini and Seklo, enhancing the experience even more.

Of particular interest are also the ancient tombs that hosts the museum. The tombs are exposed exactly as found with the skeletons and sacrificial objects.

The museum is not in the city center, but it is very easy to find as it is located next to the hospital. If you don’t have a car, you can just hop on Bus 1, which will leave you straight to the entrance. Tickets are quite affordable, while the collections are not very big, so they will not bore you or your children.

Families should know

From November to March, admission is free on Sundays

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Anastasia Valti-Spanopoulou was born and raised in Athens, Greece. After a year in Law School, she left Athens to pursue a degree in Comparative Literature and History of Art in Scotland. In 2014 she returned to Greece. As a student she did several different jobs including translation, teaching at a nursery school, screenwriting and, of course, waitressing! When she’s not busy reading ridiculously old books, she enjoys playing the piano, struggles to learn Russian and travels to places with excellent cuisine and plentiful galleries!